We are dedicated to improving access to editing for everyone, including and especially disabled and marginalized people, first-time authors, and people who might not be able to afford our services. To that end, we would like to highlight a few free and low-cost resources for writers (and anyone who’s interested). Take note that none of these are meant as a cure-all: the best way to improve your writing is to write more and to read widely. This list was last updated on 26 Aug 2017:

  • The Hemingway Editor, a free online application that automatically makes style suggestions.
  • Feminist Frequency’s Feminism 101, a free online information center with some great information to help people learn more about current feminist conversations.
  • Lorelei Logsdon’s free guide to Working with a Freelance Editor, which has good information on what many editors actually do, for when you are in a position to hire one.
  • The free Library Extension for Chrome adds a box to online book markets that shows whether a book is in stock at your local library.
  • Renni Browne’s and David King’s book Self-Editing for Fiction Authors, which has tips that can help bridge the gap between unedited and professionally edited work. You may also be able to find this at your local library or read it through an interlibrary loan.
  • Scott Norton’s book Developmental Editing, which details the kind of work that a developmental editor might do with your manuscript and gives you these same tools for re-drafting on your own. You may also be able to find this at your local library or read it through an interlibrary loan.
  • Vonna Carter’s frequently-updated list of conferences for Editors and Art Directors, Literary Agents, and Indie Publishers. She also maintains lists of Writing Retreats, Online Writing Classes, and workshops specifically for Young Writers.
  • You may also wish to attend the Association of Writers and Writing Programs’ (AWP’s) Conference.
  • The Nelson Literary Agency’s series of “Pub Rants,” in particular the “9 Story Openings to Avoid” series. As with any writing advice, be mindful of taking this at face value: if you are a skilled enough writer, you can write in defiance of these and other pointers. However, the recommendations included in the Pub Rants are good identifications of things that are difficult to write while maintaining reader interest and engagement.
  • If you want an agent, you can learn a lot about writing query letters from the Query Shark blog.
  • Katharine O’Moore-Klopf’s aptly-titled Copyeditors’ Knowledge Base.
  • If you haven’t already encountered anything similar, it may be worthwhile to read books on the craft of writing. Not everything in these books will be relevant to you and your style, but you may find something useful to you. Some of the most commonly recommended of these are:
  • If you are looking for a book cover or making your own, The Book Designer runs a monthly contest where he evaluates cover design submissions. This is a good way for you to become acquainted with different genres, principles of design, and your favored styles, and may also provide a means for you to get in contact with a book designer or design firm that would do your manuscript justice.
  • WebsiteSetup has a pretty comprehensive, step-by-step guide to setting up and customizing WordPress.
  • If you are writing an academic paper or anything that requires citations, Zotero is an amazing citations manager. We both used it for our master’s theses, and cannot recommend it highly enough. If you provide it with citation-relevant information, it can export that information to in-line, footnote, and bibliographic formats of many different citation styles. It comes pre-loaded with a small number of highly-used styles (e.g. Chicago, APA, MLA, and a few others), and it’s very easy to download additional styles from its online database.
  • We have not been solicited to link to any of the above resources. If you own any of the above resources and wish us to remove them from our list for any reason, please let us know.